Dress responsibly,

WHY WEAR ANIMAL FREE?

The breeding of animals and the manufacture of products of animal origin (furs, feathers, hides, skins, silk, wool, and other yarns) infringe animal rights, use substances that are harmful to human health, and cause a severe environmental impact.

Learn how to identify animal derived materials: you will discover that wearing clothing that is not sourced from animals is beneficial not only to animals, but also to your health and the environment!

  • FURS

    Minks, foxes, raccoon dogs, chinchillas, coyotes, raccoons, rabbits, and many others: at least 70 million captive animals and 10 million wild animals become furs every year, taking a very high toll on animal lives. Producing as little as 1kg of fur (mink) requires the killing of 12 animals. In addition, some toxic and carcinogenic chemical substances, used in the manufacture of furs, may remain present in the finished products. As an alternative to animal furs, you may use different types of fibre, either renewable (natural vegetable or man-made artificial) or non-renewable (man-made synthetic).

  • FEATHERS

    Feathers for padding are obtained from ducks and geese: just 100g of feathers or down from a duck and 150200g from a goose. Although many companies claim that they are not using the painful and cruel practice of live-plucking, animals are bred under conditions that fail to meet their natural needs. Products with “genuine feathers” are not better than those with synthetic padding. Indeed, comparative tests demonstrate that alternative synthetic materials have a better breathability than feathers. As an alternative to feathers, you may use different types of fibre, either renewable (natural vegetable or man-made artificial) or non-renewable (man-made synthetic).

  • "TRADITIONAL" HIDES AND SKINS

    Cattle, horses, sheep, goats, and pigs: millions of animals (adults and young) are sacrificed each year to produce hides and skins for the fashion industry. Contrary to what one may think, hides and skins are not derived from food industry waste, but are a business in itself. The tanning process uses numerous substances that are toxic and carcinogenic to humans. Moreover, liquid and solid waste, animal residues, and gas emissions from the processing and tanning of hides and skins pollute the environment. As an alternative to hides and skins, you may use different types of fibre, either renewable (natural vegetable or man-made artificial) or non-renewable (man-made synthetic).

  • WOOL

    With a 25% share of worldwide production, Australia is the primary global exporter of wool. Even if sheep reared for wool are not killed, shearing is a very cruel process, which may cause cuts or injuries to the immobilised animals. In some instances, sheep undergo partial amputations (mulesing). Every year, when wool production decreases, tens of millions of sheep are loaded onto ships destined for the Middle East and North Africa to be slaughtered. As an alternative to wool, you may use different types of fibre, either renewable (natural vegetable or man-made artificial) or non-renewable (man-made synthetic).

  • OTHER YARNS OF ANIMAL ORIGIN

    Fifty per cent of the goats that produce prized mohair wool are bred in South Africa, whereas cashmere goats are raised especially in Asia and the Middle East. Yarns are also obtained from many South-American camelids (alpaca, vicuna, guanaco, and llama), as well as camels and yaks. Soil erosion, desertification, lack of traceability, and poor animal welfare are just some of the critical issues raised by these industries. Moreover, angora wool is sourced from rabbits: the yarn is obtained in a cruel way, by ripping the fur from live animals. As an alternative to yarns of animal origin, you may use different types of fibre, either renewable (natural vegetable or man-made artificial) or non-renewable (man-made synthetic).

  • SILK

    Up to 50,000 silkworms are sacrificed to harvest 100kg of cocoons, from which 20-25kg of silk are produced. Silkworms are plunged into boiling water and killed before they leave their cocoons. This is a cruel practice, which does not take into account the existence of numerous cheaper and stronger alternative materials. The high number of animals killed, waste of water resources, and use of substances harmful to human health are the key critical aspects of this industry. As an alternative to silk, you may use different types of fibre, either renewable (natural vegetable or man-made artificial) or non-renewable (man-made synthetic).

  • HIDES AND SKINS FROM EXOTIC ANIMALS

    Due to the lack of reliable data and sources, it is impossible to quantify the number of exotic animals, e.g. pythons, lizards, alligators, crocodiles, but also ostriches, sharks, rays, and eels, which are killed for the luxury fashion industry. These animals are often caught in the wild, forced to live in captivity, and then cruelly killed: beheading, a blow to the head, and asphyxia are the most common methods. In these industries, there are no rules on the protection of animals, on their monitoring and control by third parties, as well as on effective inspections and detailed reporting, with the consequent risk of feeding their illegal trade. As an alternative to hides and skins, you may use different types of fibre, either renewable (natural vegetable or man-made artificial) or non-renewable (man-made synthetic).

  • KANGAROO SKINS

    In Australia, 45 million kangaroos have been culled in the past 20 years, with a view to creating grazing land for sheep reared for their wool. This is an alarming figure, which does not consider approximately 700,000 orphaned joeys that die every year after the killing of their mothers. It is an unprecedented slaughter that supplies the kangaroo meat and skin business. In Europe, Italy is the leading importer of raw kangaroo skins (over 2 million bought from 2012 to 2016). The most common users of these skins are sportswear companies: motorcycling (suits) and soccer (footwear). As an alternative to hides and skins, you may use different types of fibre, either renewable (natural vegetable or man-made artificial) or non-renewable (man-made synthetic).